Green Lemonade | Juicing for Health

Green Lemonade Green Lemonade | Juicing for Health
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So let’s talk juice.

Not the kinds you buy in the grocery store, but freshly pressed homemade vegetable and fruit juices.

Juicing is one of the best things you can do for your body.  It provides your body with a concentrated source of vitamins and minerals in a highly absorbable form.  You get a hefty dose of vegetables and fruit and all their valuable micronutrients down to the very last drop because the process of juicing makes them so easily assimilated by the body.

Not only that, but a freshly pressed juice in the morning can be easier on your digestive system and a good way to start the day off with a nutrient-dense drink.

I’ve talked a bit about the benefits of juicing before so now it’s time to talk about how to make your own juice at home with a juicer.

Fennel Apple Celery Lemons Green Lemonade | Juicing for Health

Juicing Tips:

1.)    Buy organic vegetables and fruits.  You don’t want any pesticide residue in your fresh juice.  You don’t peel fruits and vegetables when you juice so this is very important.

2.)    Start with vegetables and fruits you like and are used to first.  Juice vegetables like carrots, celery and cucumber which have a light, pleasing taste and then slowly introduce dark leafy greens as your palate becomes accustomed to the taste of fresh vegetable juice.

3.)    Try to avoid making juices that are high in sugar content.  While fruit juices can be a sweet treat every once in a while, they are high in sugar and can affect blood sugar levels.  Try to mix in vegetables and make a juice that has more vegetables than fruit.

4.)    Along those lines stay away from using too many root vegetables like beets and carrots b/c they have a slightly higher sugar content.  Those are fine to start with but use them judiciously.

5.)    Drink your juice as soon as possible after pressing.  If possible, drinking the juice within 1 hour is optimal as it starts to lose its nutritional value as time passes.  If you do store your juices keep them in a glass container in the fridge for up to 24 hours.

6.)    Prepare your ingredients the night before to make juicing easier in the mornings.  Washing everything ahead of time is a real time saver.  Have your juicer out on the counter easily accessible as well so you don’t have to pull it out every time you need to use it.

Fennel 4 Green Lemonade | Juicing for Health

Here’s one of my favorite juice recipes to get you started.  I call it my green lemonade; it’s a fennel, apple and celery juice with mint and parsley.

The combination of fennel, celery and parsley can be helpful for water retention as they have a mild diuretic effect.  Celery has both sodium and potassium and is particularly good at replenishing lost minerals in the body after exercise or illness.  Mint is a good digestive aid as is fennel which has a slightly sweet and mild anise flavor.  Parsley is a powerhouse vegetable when it comes to juicing, it’s is high in vitamin C and is considered an immune booster.

A little bit of tart green apple and freshly squeezed lemon juice is what makes this juice “lemonade,” as they offer a little sweetness and tartness and balance the juice’s flavors.

Fennel Apple Celery Juice 2 Green Lemonade | Juicing for Health

Cheers to your health!

Green Lemonade Juice Recipe

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Fennel, Apple, Celery Juice with Mint and Parsley

Ingredients

  • 1 small head of fennel or ½ a large one
  • 2 stalks of celery
  • 1 handful of mint
  • 1 bunch flat leaf parsley
  • ½ tart green apple like a granny smith
  • 2 small lemons, peeled

Instructions

  1. Put all ingredients through a juicer.
  2. Stir, and drink immediately.

Notes

Gluten Free, Grain Free, Vegetarian, Vegan

http://gourmandeinthekitchen.com/2012/green-lemonade-juice-recipe-juicing-for-health/
 Green Lemonade | Juicing for Health

Do you juice?

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  1. says

    You pictures are just so, so gorgeous!
    I am not a lemonade fan – I just can’t take sour foods and drinks too well. But just from the looks of this, I’d love to try it. I stand in awe of your photography! :)

  2. says

    I just pulled my juicer out the other day and put it right on my kitchen counter so I would use it more. Love your combination of veggies and herbs in this juice. I used carrot, cucumber, kale and pear – a baby beginner green “lemonade.” Planning on adding more greens the more I juice.

  3. Renee F. says

    This week I have been juicing for the hubbie and I the following:

    4 apples (organic)
    6 carrots (organic)
    1 cup of spinach (organic)
    1/4 cup Parsley (the store ran out of organic)

    My hubbie never knows about the spinach but loves the juice. It is a sneaky way to make him eat it. LOL

  4. says

    I love green drinks/smoothies and this one looks beautiful and so fresh. I can almost taste the tartness of the lemon and apple combination. Yum!
    I tend to have a kale smoothie every other day. It’s a convenient and healthy on-the-go lunch.

    BTW, your pictures are gallery worthy. WOW!

  5. says

    That juice is a beauty. I get on these juice kicks and then I put away the juicer to make room in the kitchen and then forget about it for awhile. This would be nice at lunch. Thanks!

  6. says

    This juice looks absolutely amazing! I still haven’t purchased a juicer yet, but make green smoothies daily. I will have to try this combo!

    Are you aware of the added benefits of juicing vs. drinking smoothies? Just curious if it’s worth the investment!

    Cheers,

    Alyssa

    • says

      Juicing extracts only the juice of the fruits and vegetables, while a smoothie includes the fiber and pulp, so there are a few differences between the two. Juicing allows for faster absorption of nutrients. Because there’s no fiber, juices are a concentrated and readily absorbed source of vitamins and minerals. Removing fiber also means that there’s less digestive work needed to process the food.

      Because smoothies contain fiber, they are more slowly absorbed into the blood stream and your blood sugar levels remain stable and you will feel fuller longer. You can also add protein to a smoothie, making it a more balanced meal replacement. The fiber in smoothies also helps keep your digestive tract moving and feeds the good bacteria in your gut.

      So to answer your question, I think they both have their place in a healthy diet.

      • says

        Sylvie, thank you for the detailed and thoughtful response. I can see now why many people juice over drinking smoothies. I’ve always been a smoothie fan and felt like they were extremely nutritious and filling, but the world of juicing is becoming ever more enticing.

        For a novice juicer like myself, do you recommend going out and purchasing one of the top of line machines, like a Breville or Omega juicer? Or do you know if there are other models that work well but aren’t as large of an investment? I definitely would love to start exploring the wonderful juice recipes I have stumbled across!

        Thanks again for your help. It’s much appreciated!

        Alyssa

        • says

          Hi Alyssa,

          There are two main kinds of juicers: centrifugal juicers and masticating juicers.

          Centrifugal juicers are the most common, and in general, the most affordable. The food is pushed into a mesh chamber with a sharp rapidly spinning blade on the bottom. Centrifugal juicers work best with soft and hard fruits and vegetables, but not as well with leafy greens like kale or spinach, or wheatgrass.

          Masticating juicers are generally the more expensive type of juicer. These juicers use a low speed powerful motor to thoroughly press out the juice. Because of the slow crushing and squeezing, masticating juicers can better process leafy greens and wheatgrass, and the juice produced will last longer than juice made in a centrifugal juicer, which should be consumed right away as it starts losing nutrients fairly quickly.

          There are definitely quite a few options for you in the category of centrifugal juicers that would be around $100. This Jack LaLanne Juicer is less than $100 for example. I suggest you choose the juicer that will best juice the types of fruits and vegetables that you are most interested in using.

  7. says

    You might be the only person on the planet to tempt me into drinking a green drink. It’s one of my quirks, not healthy I know but I’m working on it :D It is my year to be daring.

  8. says

    Sylvie, I’m smitten by your photography! Myhusband and I are starting a juice fast on Monday for a week, we will be trying this recipe. Look forward to more.

  9. says

    Absolutely stunning photographs, as always :) I got to your blog very recently, but have been hooked ever since. The juice looks great, just the kind that I need to stick to my detox plan.

  10. says

    Your blog is my favourite these days. I have been guzzling juice such as yours for some days now. Thank you so much for more ideas. I am sure the apple in my juice will give it the necessary tangy kick.

  11. says

    Fennel, apple and celery is so delicious combined in a salad, so can imagine the flavours work really well in a juice too. And the colour is so incredibly vibrant – gorgeous, health-giving and delicious…great post to beat the January blues :-)

  12. says

    I have started to include more juices for breakfasts. Most of the time it was apple, carrot and ginger. I will try adding fennel! Gorgeous post!

  13. says

    I’m into too much juicing these days. There’s nothing like having freshly pressed juice to make you feel good :) Love the lovely green you’ve pictured–I still have to try celery and fennel. Hope you are having a wonderful new year!

  14. Jennifer says

    This sounds expensive to me. At my grocery store it costs almost 1 dollar for a regular apple, let alone an organic one. I just wish there was a less expensive to b healthy.

    • says

      I absolutely agree with you, it can be very expensive to buy all organic but I try to look at it as an investment in my health. I think in the long run it will be cheaper to spend the money on whole organic foods and avoid costly medical bills down the line. That being said I know how difficult it can be to buy absolutely everything organic so I think it’s best to at least try and avoid buying the dirty dozen. Here’s a useful app that comes in handy for knowing which foods to avoid buying conventional when shopping: Dirty Dozen.

    • says

      That’s a good question and I think you need to consider what kinds of fruits and vegetables you plan on juicing and how often you planning on using it before purchasing a juicer. Here are the main differences between the two most common types of juicers on the market today.

      There are two main kinds of juicers: centrifugal juicers and masticating juicers.

      Centrifugal juicers are the most common, and in general, the most affordable. The food is pushed into a mesh chamber with a sharp rapidly spinning blade on the bottom. Centrifugal juicers work best with soft and hard fruits and vegetables, but not as well with leafy greens like kale or spinach, or wheatgrass.

      Masticating juicers are generally the more expensive type of juicer. These juicers use a low speed powerful motor to thoroughly press out the juice. Because of the slow crushing and squeezing, masticating juicers can better process leafy greens and wheatgrass, and the juice produced will last longer than juice made in a centrifugal juicer, which should be consumed right away as it starts losing nutrients fairly quickly.

      So choose the type of juicer that you think works best for your needs.

      Hope that helps!

  15. says

    I’ve been wanting a juicer for a long time. The only thing pretending me is counter and cabinet space. When you have a closet kitchen it’s just hard to buy much. Anyway, your green lemonade is making my mouth water.

  16. says

    I can’t wait to try this combination-looks and sounds great. And I love the added health benefits-I need that to offset all the sugar I consume. :)

    That first photograph is awesome-so clean and bright.

  17. says

    Great tips, photos, and explanation of juice benefits.
    I keep my juicer on one corner of the counter-top in kitchen, because my husband & I drink juice almost every other day, using varieties of vegetables & fruits combinations.
    Since we’re vegetarians, vegetables & fruits are all the more important part of our diet.
    I also used to grow wheatgrass at home in very simple ways & drank a shot of wheatgrass juice everyday; stopped that during these winters but will resume soon.
    I noticed some of your readers asked about juicers.
    Earlier I used my regular Bella Cucina (some $30) with grinder & blender blades, and then a sieve to press and extract juice & discard pulp.
    Recently purchased a Bella 700 Watt Juice Extractor & would say that it works well for fruits like oranges & pineapple, and vegetables such as celery & carrots, by extracting fine liquid juice one side & dry pulp the other. But wouldn’t recommend for things like bananas, because it wastes a lot of banana pulp unnecessarily that could be consumed instead. I haven’t tried it with wheatgrass yet. But this juicer was for some $40 after sale (original some $70) in Macy’s, and I think is fine if people can’t invest in something too expensive.
    Or people can go the simple but time-consuming grinding/blending/sieving method.
    However, as you have explained earlier in your comments, it does depend on what (and how) a person will generally use the juicer for.
    Just thought of adding my two cents, Sylvie, hope it’s okay… :)

  18. says

    Hi Sylvie – Happy New Year! Do you use a juicer or a vitamix? I am getting a vitamix regardless, but I am also considering the Hurom. Would love to know your thoughts!! xx

    • says

      I use both a high speed blender and a juicer as they do different things. The blender I use is a Blendtec and it’s what I use to make smoothies and “whole fruit” juices which have the pulp but a vitamix is great too. I use an Omega juicer for my juices but I’ve heard great things about the Hurom, seems like a great quality masticating juicer that would be good for greens and harder fruits and vegetables.

  19. says

    I’m just now catching up to green juices. this recipe is a step up for me, but I really want to try to add more than the bare minimum (what I do now). I love the idea of mint. Is the mint strong? Maybe one little leaf is enough?

    • says

      The mint adds freshness here but it’s not at all overwhelming. I’d say try at least a small palm full of mint leaves, I don’t think you would taste just one leaf.

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